Southern Peach Cobbler (2024)

This Southern Peach Cobbler recipe is a tasty combination of flaky crust and sweet, creamy peaches. It’s an easy-to-make classic Southern dessert that’s perfect for any occasion.

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This recipe is a real winner, especially when fresh peaches are not in season. By using canned peaches, you can enjoy that same authentic flavor and the perfect texture without waiting for peach season.

If you love the combination of sweet and tangy flavors, you should definitely try my lemon bars. They’re the perfect balance of sweet and sour, just like this cobbler. And for more sweet treats, my crescent cookies and cinnamon cake are always a hit with cobbler fans.

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This Southern recipe was found in a Presbyterian church cookbook from Irving Texas. It was published in 1988 and holds many unique recipes like this one! My husband being from the South was super excited for me to test this one – and he was thrilled with the results!

Table of Contents

Why I Love This Recipe

  • Classic Southern Flavors: This recipe captures the classic, comforting flavors of a traditional Southern peach cobbler. It’s a timeless dessert that’s a hit with everyone just like this buttermilk pie.
  • Simple to Make: This cobbler is surprisingly simple to make. With just a few basic ingredients and some easy-to-follow steps, you can have this classic dessert ready in no time.
  • Pie Crust-Like Topping: The unique pie crust-like topping sets this cobbler apart from the rest. It’s a cross between a pie crust and a biscuit that will have everyone asking for the recipe.
  • Southern Charm: There’s just something about a warm slice of peach cobbler that feels like a big ol’ hug from the South. It’s a dessert that’s as sweet as it is charming.
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Key Ingredients

  • Peaches: These canned peaches will bring a sweet and juicy flavor to our cobbler, and their soft texture is perfect for baking.
  • All-Purpose Flour: This is used in both the peach filling and the top crust. It helps to thicken the filling and gives the crust a nice, sturdy texture.
  • Ground Cinnamon: Just a dash of this spice will add a warm, sweet flavor that pairs perfectly with the peaches.
  • Lemon Juice: The acidity of the lemon juice will brighten up the flavor of the peaches and keep them from turning brown.
  • Granulated Sugar: This will sweeten the peach filling and also help to thicken it. Plus, it will also sweeten the crust and give it a golden color as it bakes.
  • Butter: We’ll use this in the peach filling to add a rich, buttery flavor. It will also be used for our top crust.
  • Salt: A pinch of salt in the top crust will enhance all the flavors in the cobbler and balance the sweetness of the peaches and sugar.
  • Baking Powder: This is the leavening agent that will give us the best texture.
  • Cold Water: This will help bring the crust together, making it easier to work with and giving it a flaky texture.

Equipment

  • 9×9 or 7×11 baking dish – This is where all the magic happens. It’s essential for baking the peach cobbler and making sure it turns out just right.
  • Wax Paper – This helps to roll out the top crust without it sticking to the rolling pin or the counter. It makes the process much easier and less messy.

How to Make Southern Peach Cobbler

Preparation

To start, preheat your oven to 375˚ F and grease your 9×9 or 7×11 baking dish. This will make sure your cobbler doesn’t stick to the dish and bakes evenly.

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Step 1 – Prepare the Peach Filling

Begin by draining the canned peaches. In a separate small bowl, combine the flour, cinnamon, and sugar. Add this mixture to the drained peaches and toss them to coat. Then, add the lemon juice and stir. Put this peach mixture into your prepared baking dish and dot it with butter. Once done, set it aside.

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Step 2 – Make the Top Crust

In a separate bowl, add the flour, salt, sugar, and baking powder. Stir these ingredients together. Then, stir in the melted butter with a fork. Next, add the water all at once to form a ball. Roll out this ball between two sheets of wax paper until it’s approximately the size of your baking dish.

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Step 3 – Assemble the Cobbler

Place this rolled-out crust on top of your peach filling in the baking dish. Slice some air holes in the crust and sprinkle it with sugar.

Step 4 – Bake the Cobbler

Pop your cobbler into the preheated oven and bake it for 40-45 minutes. You’ll know it’s ready when the crust is golden brown and the peaches are bubbly.

Step 5 – Serve the Cobbler

Once baked, take your cobbler out of the oven and let it cool for a bit. It’s best served warm, and you can enjoy it on its own or with a scoop of vanilla ice cream for an extra treat.

Expert Tip

To ensure your cobbler has a perfectly golden crust, keep an eye on it towards the end of the baking time. I recommend setting your oven temperature to 35 minutes and checking for doneness. If it’s not golden, give it another 5 minutes. Every oven is different, so this little trick will help you achieve the best results.

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Recipe Variations

  • Fresh Peaches: If you have fresh peaches on hand, feel free to use them in this recipe. Simply peel and slice the peaches, and then proceed with the recipe as directed. You may need to adjust the sugar in the filling depending on the sweetness of your fresh peaches.
  • Use Canned Apples: While this recipe is for a Southern Peach Cobbler, you can easily swap out the peaches for canned apples. Follow the recipe as directed, but consider adding a touch of extra cinnamon to complement the apple flavor.
  • Add Nuts: For a bit of crunch, add a handful of chopped pecans or walnuts to the top crust before baking. This simple addition brings a new texture to the cobbler and complements the soft, juicy peaches.
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What to Serve With

  • For a classic dessert combination, serve your Southern Peach Cobbler with a scoop of vanilla ice cream. The cool, creamy vanilla is the perfect contrast to the warm, sweet cobbler.
  • If you’re a fan of a little extra sweetness, top your cobbler with a dollop of whipped cream. The lightness of the cream complements the rich flavor of the cobbler beautifully.
  • For a cozy, comforting treat, pair your peach cobbler with a cup of coffee. The bitterness of the coffee helps balance out the sweetness of the cobbler, making for a truly enjoyable dessert.

Recipe FAQs

What type of peaches should I use for this easy peach cobbler recipe?

You can use either fresh, canned, or frozen peaches for this recipe. If you’re using fresh peaches, make sure they are ripe but still firm. If you’re using canned peaches, choose ones that are in 100% fruit juice and not in a heavy syrup. If frozen, make sure to fully thaw and drain before using.

Can I add other fruits to this cobbler?

Absolutely! This recipe is for a peach cobbler, but you can mix in other fruits like blueberries, raspberries, or even sliced apples. Just keep in mind that the cooking time may vary depending on the juiciness of the additional fruits.

What’s the purpose of the lemon juice in the peach filling?

The lemon juice serves two purposes in this easy southern peach cobbler recipe. It adds a bit of tartness to balance the sweetness of the peaches and also helps the peaches keep their color and shape during baking.

Storing and Reheating

  • Storing: Leftovers can be stored in the refrigerator for up to 3 days. Make sure to let the cobbler cool completely before covering it with plastic wrap or transferring it to an airtight container.
  • Freezing: I do not recommend freezing this cobbler as the texture of the peaches can become mushy upon thawing.
  • Reheating: To reheat, simply place individual servings in the microwave for 20-30 seconds or until warmed through.

More Dessert Recipes You’ll Enjoy

  • Peach Dump Cake

  • Fresh Peach Pie Recipe

  • Homemade Fruit Crisp Recipe

  • Easy Apple Crisp Recipe

Serving Size

  • What to Expect: This easy peach cobbler recipe yields a delicious dessert for about 6-8 people.
  • How to Scale: If you’re looking to serve more than 6-8 people, you can easily double the recipe and follow the instructions as directed. Just make sure to use a larger baking dish to accommodate the increased quantity.

Southern Peach Cobbler (17)

Created by: Lynette Rice

Southern Peach Cobbler


Course Dessert

Cuisine American

Prep Time 15 minutes minutes

Cook Time 40 minutes minutes

Servings 8 servings

8 servings

This Southern Peach Cobbler recipe is a tasty combination of flaky crust and sweet, creamy peaches. It's an easy-to-make classic Southern dessert that's perfect for any occasion.

Ingredients

Peach Filling:

  • 35 oz canned peaches
  • 3 heaping Tablespoons all-purpose flour
  • ¼ teaspoon ground cinnamon
  • 2 Tablespoons lemon juice
  • 3 Tablespoons granulated sugar
  • 2 Tablespoons butter

Top Crust:

  • 1 ¼ Cup all purpose flour
  • ½ teaspoon salt
  • ¼ Cup granulated sugar
  • ½ teaspoon baking powder
  • Cup butter melted
  • 2 Tablespoons cold water

Instructions

  • Preheat oven to 375˚ F. Grease a 9×9 or 7×11 baking dish.

Peach Filling:

  • Drain the canned peaches. In a small bowl combine the flour, cinnamon and sugar. Add to the drained peaches and toss to coat. Add the lemon juice and stir.

  • Put the drained peach mixture into the baking dish and dot with butter. Set aside.

Top Crust:

  • To a bowl add the flour, salt, sugar, and baking powder. Stir. Stir in the melted butter with a fork and then add the water all at once to form a ball.

  • Roll out the ball in between two sheets of wax paper until the approximate size of your baking dish. Place on top of peach filling. Slice air holes and sprinkle with sugar.

  • Bake in a 375˚ F oven for 40-45 minutes or until golden brown and peaches are bubbly. Serve warm.

Notes

Expert Tip: To ensure your cobbler has a perfectly golden crust, keep an eye on it towards the end of the baking time. I recommend setting your oven temperature to 35 minutes and checking for doneness. If it’s not golden, give it another 5 minutes. Every oven is different, so this little trick will help you achieve the best results.

Storing: Leftovers can be stored in the refrigerator for up to 3 days. Make sure to let the cobbler cool completely before covering it with plastic wrap or transferring it to an airtight container.

Freezing: I do not recommend freezing this cobbler as the texture of the peaches can become mushy upon thawing.

Reheating: To reheat, simply place individual servings in the microwave for 20-30 seconds or until warmed through.

Nutrition

Serving: 1serving | Calories: 260kcal | Carbohydrates: 39g | Protein: 3g | Fat: 11g | Saturated Fat: 7g | Polyunsaturated Fat: 1g | Monounsaturated Fat: 3g | Trans Fat: 0.4g | Cholesterol: 28mg | Sodium: 272mg | Potassium: 180mg | Fiber: 2g | Sugar: 21g | Vitamin A: 729IU | Vitamin C: 7mg | Calcium: 27mg | Iron: 1mg

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Southern Peach Cobbler (2024)

FAQs

Why is peach cobbler popular in the South? ›

“The history of peach cobbler as a Southern dish dates back to the early 1800s when African Americans started to combine fruits like peaches with spices and flour to make a sweet, tasty dessert. This combination was then covered with a biscuit-like topping and baked.”

What is Southern vs Northern cobbler? ›

Up North, cobbler is fruit baked under a baking powder biscuit crust. Down South, that same fruit is covered with sweetened batter, yielding a very moist yellow cake heavily laden with fruit: bottom, middle, and top.

What are the ingredients in Patti LaBelle's peach cobbler? ›

Ingredients
  • 1 stick (8 tablespoons) unsalted butter.
  • 2 ready-made pie crusts.
  • 1 cup all-purpose flour, plus for dusting the work surface.
  • 3 tablespoons agave syrup.
  • 1 1/4 teaspoons cinnamon, plus more for sprinkling.
  • 3/4 teaspoon nutmeg.
  • Four 29-ounce cans sliced peaches, drained.
  • Kosher salt.

How do you keep peach cobbler from getting soggy? ›

We love cobblers for being juicy, but really ripe fruit can make more puddles than a spring rain. The result is a soupy cobbler with a soggy top. Try this: Add one to two tablespoons of cornstarch to the filling.

Which state is famous for peach cobbler? ›

In the peach-loving state of Georgia, it's no surprise that the quintessential peach cobbler dominates.

Which is better for peach cobbler canned or frozen peaches? ›

If using frozen peaches, thaw, chop, and blot them dry before using. Readers have raved about this dessert using frozen, thawed peaches. Canned peaches are not ideal because they're already too soft and mushy.

What is the old name for a cobbler? ›

A cobbler, also known as a shoemaker or cordwainer, repairs and restores footwear.

Why is fruit cobblers not considered a pie? ›

What makes a cobbler different from a pie? The biggest difference between a cobbler and a pie is the placement of the dough. Pies have, at a minimum, a bottom crust with the fruit placed on top, while a cobbler has the fruit on the bottom and a dolloped dough on top instead.

What's the difference between peach crisp and peach cobbler? ›

Peach crisp and peach cobbler both showcase peaches, but they have different toppings. Peach crisp includes a buttery streusel-like oat crumb topping, while peach cobbler typically has a thicker, more substantial biscuit topping. Both are easier than pie!

Why is my Peach Cobbler gummy? ›

You shouldn't have a problem with Peach Cobbler being gummy if you use fresh fruit unless you overcook it. Canned peaches, however, can result in a gummy filling because the peaches are already softer to begin with and bathed in heavy syrup. Make sure to thoroughly drain the peaches before using.

What are the ingredients in Mrs Smith Peach Cobbler? ›

Ingredients: Filling: Peaches, Water, Sugar, Corn Syrup, Modified Food Starch, Salt, Spice, Annatto (color). Crust: Wheat Flour, Shortening Butter Blend (palm Oil, Butter [cream, Salt]), Palm Oil, Water, Soybean Oil, Salt, Dextrose, Yeast, Mono- And Diglycerides.

Is cobbler dough the same as pie crust? ›

Cobbler is sometimes described as a kind of fruit pie, but strictly speaking, the two are different. Pies are made from pastry, rather than biscuit batter, and they are fully encased, with a crust at the top and the bottom, while cobblers typically only have a topping.

How do you keep the bottom crust of a peach pie from getting soggy? ›

Sprinkle dried breadcrumbs or crushed cornflakes, or other types of cereal, on the bottom crust before filling and baking in the oven.

Is it better to peel peaches for cobbler? ›

Keeping those beautiful skins on gives the cooked cobbler a gorgeous, deep peachy-pink hue and even more depth of flavor. Plus, unlike other cobbler or pie fruit with tougher skins, like apples, peach skins melt away into the cobbler filling.

How to thicken peach cobbler without cornstarch? ›

Water and flour can be combined to make a thickening agent for peach cobbler. This mixture is commonly known as a "flour slurry."

Is cobbler a southern thing? ›

The region most associated with cobbler is the American South, where the variation of choice remains peach cobbler (preferably with a pairing of vanilla ice cream). Per Culture Trip, peach cobbler is thought to have originated with the recipe common to all early cobblers: essentially, fruit plus dough plus fire.

What is the cultural significance of peach cobbler? ›

Such is also the case with the Peach Cobbler: A peach pie from the Deep South of the USA which embodies the regional identity and cultural heritage of the American South and tells the history of the settlers.

When did peach cobbler become popular? ›

As Americans pushed into the West and settled the frontier, fruit could be difficult to come by. Simple and easy fruit cobblers became popular dishes for breakfast as well as dessert. It was in the mid-1800s, as westward expansion in America took off, that peach cobbler rose in popularity.

What race invented peach cobbler? ›

Cobblers, meanwhile, appear to have originated in the British American colonies, where English settlers, rather than being handicapped by unfamiliar ingredients and different cooking equipment, did what cooks always do, improvising something new.

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